Curriculum Modules

Still image of a scene in the episode entitled If Knowledge is the Key
If Knowledge is the Key
Central to an understanding of race in America is the ways that race and racism became part of the legal systems of the country. Elizabeth Key was a bi-racial woman who sued for her freedom in colonial Virginia. Her story allows us to begin to understand the ways that one legal decision can have far reaching and ranging effects.
Still image of a scene in the episode entitled A Mother's Bond
A Mother's Bond
This module explores a heartbreaking tale from 1845 that spans the locations of Savannah, Georgia and Northampton, Massachusetts. We examine Catherine Linda’s story—a woman enslaved in Georgia, but told she could be free in Massachusetts. This complicated story clearly illustrates the intricate web between the North and the South and the institution of slavery. This episode is in post-production and will be available soon.
Still image of a scene in the episode entitled The Truth is Powerful
The Truth is Powerful
Through the inspiring and powerful story of Sojourner Truth, students learn about a powerful force for justice and the complexities and subjectivities of recording history, and in particular the differing accounts of the life, work, and words of Ms. Truth, and how we read and understand those accounts today.
Still image of a scene in the episode entitled Red Summers: 1919
Red Summers: 1919
This is a story of a time of extreme and widespread violence against African-Americans and African-American communities. At the heart of the story is the power and resilience that can be seen in the multitude of ways that Black people stood up to and fought back against the injustices and violence they faced.
Still image of a scene in the episode entitled What Happens to a Dream Destroyed?
What Happens to a Dream Destroyed?
Students confront the devastating history of June 1, 1921, when the affluent African-American neighborhood of Greenwood, in Tulsa, Oklahoma, was destroyed by deputized white mobs. Historians believe approximately 300 members of this community were murdered.
Still image of a scene in the episode entitled One Minute's Freedom
One Minute's Freedom
The story of Elizabeth “Mumbet” Freeman and the abolition of slavery in Massachusetts allows educators and their students to examine the tensions and contradictions between the professed ideals of the United States and the actual practices of the United States and to consider the ways that enslaved people used the professed ideals of the United States to argue for their own liberation.
Still image of a scene in the episode entitled I Got A Letter from the Government
I Got A Letter from the Government
Through the story of Benjamin Banneker and his letter exchange with Thomas Jefferson, students examine some of the tensions and contradictions between the professed ideals of the United States and and to consider the ways that enslaved people used the professed ideals of the United States to argue for their own liberation.