Georgia US History 11 Connection: The Truth is Powerful

Georgia US History 11 Connection: The Truth is Powerful

These connections take Self-Evident videos and explicitly connect them to Georgia US History standards. An optional extension article is included to further set the video in larger context. For other lessons that dive deeper into the historical context or original story, check out the Self-Evident curriculum library.

Standards:

  • SSUSH7.d: Explain how the significance of slavery grew in American politics including… abolitionism.
  • SSUSH8 Explore the relationship between slavery, growing north-south divisions, and westward expansion that led to the outbreak of the Civil War

US History Basic Connection:

  1. Complete the Basic Plan for “The Truth is Powerful”
  2. Transition to the standard: “Sojourner Truth’s story is part of the lead-up to the Civil War.
  3. Ask students to write about or discuss in pairs, small groups, or as a class some or all of the following:
    • What does the video show us about the abolitionist movement in general?
    • What does the information in the video show us about how the abolitionist movement made slavery an important political issue?
    • How does the work of Sojourner Truth and the other people we saw in the video contribute to growing north-south divisions that will result in the Civil War?

Optional US History Larger Context:

  1. Set a purpose for reading: “To understand the bigger picture of Truth’s story, we’re going to read a short article. As you read, think about how Truth’s story fits into this larger history of Black women fighting to abolish slavery.”
  2. Have students read “Expansion & Reform: Black Women & the Abolition of Slavery” from Newsela, also available in Spanish and at varied reading levels.
  3. Ask students to write about or discuss in pairs, small groups, or as a class some or all of the prompts:
    • How does the new information in this article help us understand Truth’s story better?
    • How does it help us understand North-South divisions better?
    • What was unique about Black women abolitionists? What does this tell us about the intersection of race and gender?
    • Why were Black women abolitionists so important and yet so overlooked?
    • How does the work of Black women abolitionists change over time? How does it stay the same? Why do you think that is so?