Georgia US History 11 Connection: What Happens to a Dream Destroyed?

Georgia US History 11 Connection: Red Summer 2

These connections take Self-Evident videos and explicitly connect them to Georgia US History standards. An optional extension article is included to further set the video in larger context. For other lessons that dive deeper into the historical context or original story, check out the Self-Evident curriculum library.

Standard:

  • SSUSH13 Evaluate efforts to reform American society and politics in the Progressive Era.

US History Basic Connection:

  1. Complete the Basic Plan for “What Happens to a Dream Destroyed?”
  2. Transition to the standard: “Tulsa’s Greenwood neighborhood, or “Black Wall Street,” was an example of everyday Black people responding to the violence and injustice around them by forming their own community. There were several intentionally all-Black communities in America starting in the late 1800s.”
  3. Ask students to write about or discuss in pairs, small groups, or as a class some or all of the following:
    • What do you know that explains why some Black people may have decided that Black towns were their best option?
    • (If you have previously taught about Booker T. Washington and W.E.B DuBois): How does this fit with Booker T Washington’s vision? With W.E.B. DuBois’s vision?
    • To what extent is separate communities an effective strategy to address the problems Black people faced in the Jim Crow era?
    • Would you call this an effort to “reform”American society? Why or why not? If not, what would you call it?

Optional US History Larger Context:

  1. Set a purpose for reading: “To understand the bigger picture of these stories, we’re going to read two short articles about the history of Black towns. As you read, think about how this new information helps explain why Black people may have created intentionally separate communities during Jim Crow.”
  2. Have students read “Tulsa's Black Wall Street Flourished as a Self-Contained Hub in the Early 1900s” and “All Black Towns Across America: Life Was Hard But Full of Promise” from Newsela, available at varied reading levels. You may choose to have each student read both articles or divide the class in half.
  3. Ask students to write about or discuss in pairs, small groups, or as a class some or all of the following:
    • How does the new information in this article help us understand what happened in Tulsa better?
    • What new information do you have about all-Black towns in the Jim Crow era?
    • To what extent is separate communities an effective strategy to address the problems Black people faced in the Jim Crow era?

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